Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acner.org: Acne treatment

Staphylococcal Acne

Staphylococcal Acne Staphylococcal Acne Staphylococcal Acne

Overview

Staphylococcal acne isn't actually acne. It's a form of folliculitis known as staphylococcal folliculitis. With acne, pores clogged with dead skin and excess oil are infected with the P. acnes bacterium. This causes inflammation of the hair follicle, resulting in the papules or pustules associated with this skin condition. Staphylococcal folliculitis develops when hair follicles are exposed to a different type of bacteria, asserts the Mayo Clinic. Much like acne, the infection causes pustules to form. Though the two conditions may appear similar, they really have nothing to do with one another.

Staphylococcal Folliculitis

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, staphylococcal folliculitis is the most common form of folliculitis. Often referred to as barber's itch, it is an infection of the hair follicle caused by staphylococcus aureus, or staph. Naturally found on the body, this bacterium doesn't usually pose a problem until it breaches the surface of the skin.

Symptoms

As the infection sets in, it causes white, pus-filled bumps or pustules to develop along the skin. This is why people frequently identify this form of folliculitis as staphylococcal acne. But unlike acne vulgaris, the pustules are accompanied by an itching sensation, and they normally form soon after shaving.

Considerations

As mentioned before, staphylococcal folliculitis develops when the bacterium breaches the skin. This can happen through any sort break in the epidermis. Shaving is probably one of the more common culprits of this skin condition, largely due to the development of an ingrown. However, you may also develop folliculitis from a scratch, cut or sore, warns the Mayo Clinic. Even friction to the skin may expose the hair follicles to the bacteria.

Treatment

Over-the-counter acne creams most likely won't help to clear up this form of folliculitis. Treatment of the pustules usually involves antibiotics. While some people can respond favorably to OTC antibiotics, it may be necessary to use a prescription strength antibiotic to kill the bacteria affecting the follicles. The antibiotic is either taken orally or applied topically to the skin. The Mayo Clinic also recommends you avoid shaving until the pustules have healed, especially if you use a razor blade for hair removal.

Warning

If left untreated, or the infection becomes severe, it may result in permanent hair loss, skin discoloration and even scarring. As soon as the infection develops, it's critical to treat the condition and take precautions to keep the infection from worsening. To do this, wash the affected area each day and use a clean razor for each shaving.

Related Articles

How to Stop Clogged Pores in the Genital Area
Overview Clogged pores can be aggravating regardless of where they appear on your body. However, clo...
How to Treat Clogged Pores
Overview Your pores help your skin breathe. Over time, they may become clogged with oil, dirt and ot...
How to Smooth Out Large Clogged Pores
Overview Enlarged, clogged pores are generally caused by over-productive sebaceous glands or an exce...
Clogged Pores on the Chin
Overview Clogged pores on the skin lead to blackheads that become infected, creating red spots of ac...
Home Remedies for Oily Clogged Pores
Oily clogged pores are usually a symptom of mild acne or skin irritation. Though over-the-counter tr...
How to Unblock Clogged Pores
Overview No one likes dealing with prominent pores, especially when they're clogged with material. C...

Comment «Staphylococcal Acne»