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Fruits With Retinol

Fruits With Retinol Fruits With Retinol Fruits With Retinol

Overview

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin, and it is essential for proper growth and developing healthy vision and a strong immune system. Deficiency can lead to night blindness and infections, and you can prevent deficiency with a balanced diet if you are a healthy individual. Some fruits and many other foods provide vitamin A, and a nutritionist can analyze your diet to make sure that you are getting enough.

Vitamin A Overview

The active forms of vitamin A in your body are called retinoids, and they include retinol, retinoic acid and retinal, according to the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Information Center. These are known as preformed vitamin A because after you eat them, your body does not need to process them before using them. The recommended dietary allowance for adults for vitamin A is 700 mcg retinoic acid equivalents, or RAE, or 2,330 international units, or IU, for women and 900 mcg RAE or 3,000 IU for men, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Fruits With Vitamin A

Fruits and vegetables do not provide retinol. Their vitamin A is pro-vitamin A in the form of carotenoids, which your body must convert to active vitamin A. Pro-vitamin A carotenoids include beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin. Canned pumpkin provides 953 mcg RAE per half cup, a half of a medium cantaloupe has 467 mcg RAE and a mango has 79 mcg, according to the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Information Center. Tangerines and papayas also provide pro-vitamin A carotenoids.

Retinol

Animal-based foods are the only natural sources of retinol, or preformed vitamin A, according to the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Information Center. Cod liver oil is a highly concentrated source, and other sources are eggs, butter and whole milk. Retinol is the form of vitamin A that you get from fortified foods such as fortified cereals, low-fat milk and soy milk. Dietary supplements of retinol are available, but talk to your doctor before using them because too much retinol may increase your risk for osteoporosis.

Other Information

A benefit of getting vitamin A from fruits is that carotenoids are antioxidants, according to the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Information Center. Antioxidants reduce the damage that free radicals in your body can cause to your cells, and they may lower your risk for heart disease. Fruits provide vitamin C, dietary fiber and potassium, and a balanced 2,000-calorie diet should include at least two cups per day, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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