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Foods Which Cause Flatulence

Foods Which Cause Flatulence Foods Which Cause Flatulence Foods Which Cause Flatulence

Flatulence is gas rid from the body through the rectum--an action known as "passing gas." Though gas is sometimes odorless, flatulence reaps its unpleasant smell from bacteria in the large intestine. According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC), most adults pass gas about 14 times per day. Though flatulence is a normal part of health, many people find it bothersome. Limiting or avoiding certain foods may help reduce flatulence.

Sugars

Sugars, such as raffinose, lactose, fructose, and sorbitol, commonly cause gas. Raffinose is found in large amounts in beans and in lesser amounts in vegetables such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, asparagus and in whole grains. Refried beans generally cause more flatulence than whole beans. Lactose is natural sugar in cow's milk and cow's milk-containing foods. According to the NDDIC, people of African, Native American, or Asian descent are particularly prone to lactose intolerance--a condition that may cause flatulance. Fructose is found in onions, artichokes, pears, wheat and various soft drinks and juices. Sorbitol occurs naturally in fruits, such as apples, pears, peaches, and prunes. Sortbitol also works as an artificial sweetener in numerous dietetic-friendly foods and sugar-free candies and gums.

Starches

Most starches, or complex carbohydrates, trigger gas. Flatulence may occur after eating potatoes, corn, pasta, wheat and other grains. Foods made from these items, such as bread, cereals, cookies, cakes, crackers, chips and other carbohydrate-based snack foods may also cause gas. Consuming excessive amounts of these foods or eating them quickly may exacerbate gas symptoms. According to the NDDIC, rice is the only starch that does not lead to gas.

Fiber-Rich Foods

The body requires soluble and insoluble fiber for general wellness and digestive regularity. Soluble fiber, found in oat bran, beans, peas, and most fruits, dissolves easily in water. When it reaches the large intestine, it causes gas. Insoluble fiber, found in wheat bran and certain vegetables, produces less gas. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with digestion-related illnesses, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and those with intolerances to certain grains are most likely to experience flatulence in response to particular fiber-rich foods. For these individuals, consuming adequate amounts of fiber-rich foods that do not exacerbate symptoms is important for overall health. People who shift from a low-fiber diet to a high-fiber diet abruptly may also experience excessive gas until their digestive systems adjust.

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