Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acner.org: Acne treatment

Alternative Treatments for Acne

Alternative Treatments for Acne Alternative Treatments for Acne Alternative Treatments for Acne

Many acne sufferers have a collection of acne washes, masks, spot treatments and scrubs. In your search for the cure, you may have tested products that were potent, pricey and irritating. Some over-the-counter options containing harsh medicines can cause inflammation, flaking and burning. Prescription drugs are often effective but can present risky side effects. For those who are eager to end their battle with blemishes, it may be time to explore alternative approaches.

Laser and Light Treatments

In the age of advanced technology, laser and light treatments are an alternative option for acne treatment. The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) notes advantages to the treatments include not having to bother with topical applications and treatment of acne in difficult to reach places, such as the back. Some individuals, however, experience minimal results with laser and light treatments, as the treatments only target one factor--p. acnes (Propionibacterium acnes, a pore-clogging bacteria), and are often considered an incomprehensive approach, according to the AAD. In addition, repeated treatments may be pricey, but for those with acne scarring, a clear complexion is often worth the cost.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil is a powerful antiseptic, used in a plethora of hair and skin products. In comparison to benzoyl peroxide (a mainstay acne treatment, according to the AAD), studies prove that 5 percent tea tree oil presented fewer side effects and, like the benzoyl peroxide, had a significant effect on acne, reducing inflamed and non-inflamed lesions. Tea tree oil, however, was slower in action, according to the Department of Dermatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown NSW and the National Institutes of Health.

Echinacea

Echinacea is a widely used herbal supplement, derived from the brightly colored pink or purple perennials. The flowering tops and roots of echinacea are used to make teas, extracts, juices or external preparations. Many pharmacies stock the capsules on their shelves, especially during cold and flu season. The medicinal properties of the plant are believed to support immune system functioning, boosting the body's ability to fight colds, flu and infection. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) reports echinacea is also used to treat skin wounds and acne. Supplements may decrease acne by reducing bacteria that breeds blemishes (similar to the effect of antibiotics), and healing existing lesions. Results, however, are unproven.

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