Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acne for Sensitive Skin

Acne for Sensitive Skin Acne for Sensitive Skin Acne for Sensitive Skin

Overview

Acne can affect people with all types of skin, including dry skin, oily skin and sensitive skin. If you have sensitive skin and acne, standard over-the-counter acne medications may irritate your skin, making pimples redder and more irritated. Consult a dermatologist to find a more mild prescription medication for your sensitive skin and acne.

Misconceptions

Acne is not caused by stress, eating fried food, chocolate or junk food, says Kids Health. Additionally, acne doesn't improve by washing or scrubbing the face more often, or by getting a tan. Sun exposure may make acne look less severe by camouflaging it, but as soon as the tan wears off, the acne remains. According to the Mayo Clinic, the best acne treatment is a daily regimen of an effective active ingredient, which includes benzoyl peroxide, lactic acid, resorcinol, sulfur and salicylic acid.

Types

Over-the-counter acne treatments are designed to treat mild to moderate acne. Some over-the-counter acne formulas are made for sensitive skin, including AcneFree Sensitive Skin Acne System, Clean & Clear Deep Cleaning Astringent for Sensitive Skin and Oxy Sensitive Skin Cleansing Pads. These products are available at the drugstore or a department store. For moderate to severe acne, a doctor may prescribe a stronger acne medication that may be more harsh on the skin than over-the-counter treatments. These treatments may include tretinoin, tararotene and adapalene.

Effects

Over-the-counter acne medications may cause redness, drying of the skin, itching and peeling. According to the Mayo Clinic, side effects of prescription acne medications may be more severe, including flaking and scaling of the skin. People with sensitive skin may be affected by these symptoms more than those with normal skin. People with severe skin symptoms should consult a dermatologist for a less harsh acne treatment.

Prevention/Solution

Some acne medications may irritate people with sensitive skin. To reduce this sensitivity, the Mayo Clinic suggests rinsing the face several hours after applying the medication rather than leaving the medication on overnight or for the entire day. In some cases, rinsing the face reduces negative side effects. If side effectsl remain, the doctor may suggest an alternative treatment that doesn't react with the skin.

Expert Insight

The Mayo Clinic suggests that people who experience skin flaking, redness or irritation from acne medication should start on a lower dose and gradually build up to a stronger dose. Additionally, it may take several weeks or up to a month for the skin to adapt to the medication, and some dermatologists may recommend staying on the medication for one month to see if side effects subside.

Related Articles

Treatments for Acne on Older Skin
The treatment options for acne on older skin are similar to those on younger skin. They typically in...
Treatment Options for Skin Discoloration
Skin discolorations develop when pigment on one section of your skin becomes darker or lighter than ...
Acne Treatments for Older Skin
While acne is often associated with teenagers, mature adults can get it as well. This is often distr...
OXY Acne Treatments for Sensitive Skin
Oxy is a well known manufacturer of treatment products for acne. The products are available over the...
How to Compare Acne Treatments for Older Skin
Overview Acne is embarrassing enough as a teenager. Yet when an older adult gets breakouts, it can m...
Skin Boil Treatments
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria cause skin boils, also called furuncles. Boils, which form in a hair ...

Comment «Acne for Sensitive Skin»