Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acner.org: Acne treatment

Acne Around the Hair & Scalp

Acne Around the Hair & Scalp Acne Around the Hair & Scalp Acne Around the Hair & Scalp

Overview

Acne can occur anywhere on the body where there are pores. This includes the scalp and around the hairline. Acne that occurs in these areas is usually less noticeable than acne on the face because of the hair; however, it is a little more difficult to treat because of the same reason.

Causes

Acne around the hairline and scalp is caused by the same factors as anywhere else on the body. The Mayo Clinic states that as skin sheds, it may mix with sebum, a lubricating oil produced by the body. When this happens, the hair follicles may become blocked by the mixture, and bacteria may become trapped. This may cause the area to become inflamed, which can cause pimples, zits, whiteheads or blackheads and sometimes cysts.

Time Frame

After acne blemishes become visible, it can take four to eight weeks to treat them with over-the-counter (OTC) products, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. If the acne hasn't improved within that time frame, a trip to the dermatologist is in order. For severe cases that require treatment with some prescription products, the time may increase to 15 to 20 weeks. Despite some claims by product manufacturers, there isn't any effective treatment for acne that works overnight.

Treatments

OTC treatments, lifestyle changes and prescription treatments can all help acne near the hairline or on the scalp. OTC products that contain salicylic acid are appropriate for use in these areas. Because benzoyl peroxide products may bleach hair, they should be avoided, states Acne.org. Keeping the affected area clean and using only non-comedogenic products can also help. Antibiotics, topical retinoids, hormone therapies and systemic treatments are prescription options available.

Considerations

Hair products can contribute to acne flare-ups in the hairline and scalp area. Pomades, for example, are one example of a hair care product that AcneNet states can contribute to acne. As such, avoiding oil-based products in the area may help to control acne. Additionally, keeping the hair clean by shampooing daily can also help to control acne in these areas.

Warning

Folliculitis, which is an infection in the hair follicle, has symptoms that are similar to those of acne, states the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. If you experience itching in the affected area, folliculitis--not acne--may be the culprit. Because folliculitis is caused by bacteria, such as Staph, prescription treatments are needed to treat the infection.

Related Articles

Acne on My Scalp
Overview Scalp folliculitis is an inflammatory condition that affects men, women and children. Altho...
Acne of the Scalp
Overview Acne affects 40 to 50 million Americans, and although it predominantly affects teenagers, p...
Acne of the Scalp
Overview Acne affects 40 to 50 million Americans, and although it predominantly affects teenagers, p...
Body & Scalp Acne
Overview Red, painful pimples aren't just limited to your face. Although they can pop up anywhere on...
Causes of Painful Acne on My Scalp
If you have hair, you're lucky to be able to cover most acne that appears on the scalp that usually ...
Acne Around the Hair & Scalp
Overview Acne can occur anywhere on the body where there are pores. This includes the scalp and arou...

Comment «Acne Around the Hair & Scalp»